Archive for December, 2014

The moving tribute to Harry in the Cannock Advertiser obituary column, May 1916 (Cannock Library)

The moving tribute to Harry in the Cannock Advertiser obituary column, May 1916
(Cannock Library)

As a miserable man facing a financial meltdown caused by the coinciding of the eldest Wyrleyblogette’s 18th birthday, followed by Christmas and then the new year, I decided to cheer myself up by doing another one of Great Wyrley’s, and in this case, also Cheslyn Hay’s fallen soldiers of the Great War 🙂 . I had decided to pick-up on what appeared to be, and did in fact prove to be, yet another error on the Wyrley gates: Griffiths H.Y. My belief that H.Y should be Hy, for Harry, but more likely a Henry Griffiths in the formal record, was compounded by a rather curious little entry that I had come across while nipping through the Cannock Advertiser when researching a previous soldier: it was to be found in the obituary column in late May 1916 and stated that Henry Griffiths, from Cheslyn Hay, had been killed in an accident on 15 May 1916…. Read More… https://wyrleyblog.wordpress.com/wyrley-landywood/great-wyrleys-fallen-wwi/sapper-henry-griffiths-harrys-fall-from-grace/

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Jack's entry written for the roll of honour in 1917. (Staffordshire Record Office)

Jack’s entry written for the roll of honour in 1917.
(Staffordshire Record Office)

John, who was clearly also known as Jack, would prove as equally frustrating as many other of the fallen Wyrley soldiers in that his war records no longer survive; so, again, what generally that has been pieced together has come from other sources and the general military history of his battalion. Also, the search would prove that Jack wasn’t the only Gossage to go to the War: Albert, Jack’s brother, also went – only he was to survive… read more… https://wyrleyblog.wordpress.com/wyrley-landywood/great-wyrleys-fallen-wwi/john-gossage-dying-with-dai/

Wallace T Lawson, from the Walsall & District Roll of Honour. (Walsall Local History Centre)

Wallace T Lawson, from the Walsall & District Roll of Honour.
(Walsall Local History Centre)

Wallace Lawson is a soldier buried in Great Wyrley Cemetery by a twist of fate. He served in the Royal Engineers from 1915: a period that saw him in Ireland during the Easter Rising, in France through 1917 and celebrating Armistice Day there; yet he would never make it home. Read his updated story… https://wyrleyblog.wordpress.com/cheslyn-hay/cheslyn-hays-fallen-wwi/wallace-thomas-lawson-and-when-is-a-soldier-a-soldier/

The White Lion in Ind Coope & Allsopp's Livery, so prior to 1959(ish) (Bridgtown Local History Society)

The White Lion in Ind Coope & Allsopp’s Livery, so prior to 1959(ish)
(Bridgtown Local History Society)

This history of the White Lion is the last of a trilogy covering the C19th pubs of Churchbridge. The White Lion was the new kid on the block when compared with the Robin Hood and the Red Cow, both of which likely appeared swiftly after Gilpin’s works was established by 1817. They can be traced at least to the 1830s, whereas the White Lion, equally a product of industrialisation, can only be traced to 1861. It is funny, the White Lion may be in Churchbridge, but its closest neighbour was the Anglesey Arms (now the Stumble Inn) in Bridgtown…https://wyrleyblog.wordpress.com/wyrley-landywood/the-churchbridge-pubs/the-white-lion/

The sinking of the RMS Leinster, painted in 1918 by Simeon Hughes. (Holyhead Maritime Museum)

The sinking of the RMS Leinster, painted in 1918 by Simeon Hughes.
(Holyhead Maritime Museum)


The next soldier that I chose to investigate was to be WMC Woodhouse (on the Wyrley gates). Woodhouse was picked on the basis that one of my few regular blog readers is named Woodhouse and he asked me about the Woodhouse on the memorial gates, after he read the article on Joseph Masters (the photograph of the plaque with Masters’ name on it in that article also showed that of Woodhouse). What came from my basic research was that there is another error on the gate plaques and that, yet again, the real Woodhouse is as elusive as many of the other men on the memorial. https://wyrleyblog.wordpress.com/wyrley-landywood/great-wyrleys-fallen-wwi/lcpl-reginald-coley-woodhouse-catching-the-irish-mail/