Archive for the ‘Industry’ Category

The Hall on a later copy of the 1845 Tithe Map (Walsall Local History Centre)


I thought I would turn-out a few shorter articles that have their origins in the interesting questions that have been submitted to the Blog Facebook page recently. This one concerns a grave slab in Bloxwich All Saint’s Church to the ‘memory of HARRY PARKES Of Birch Hill Hall’, who was killed on 3 Aug 1833. It seemed to me that the focus of the question was the accidental death of Harry Parkes – and yes, I could help with that – but I also picked out Birch Hill Hall (Birchills Hall) and so I thought I would do a few quick paragraphs on that too…https://wyrleyblog.wordpress.com/walsall/a-grave-tale-harry-parkes-and-birchills-hall/

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Roll of Honour for Essington and Hilton, containing the names of the Walkeden brothers 2014.

Roll of Honour for Essington and Hilton, containing the names of the Walkeden brothers
2014.

Newtown is in Essington. The heart of this ‘newtown’ sprang-up opposite the Cannock Lodge Colliery but a second area of settlement also began to appear on Long Lane. This too was outside of a colliery, in this case the Norton Cannock Colliery. Both the Cannock Lodge and the Norton Cannock closed in 1910 and you would have thought would have killed off the small settlement on Long Lane, but it didn’t. Small as this community was, it still managed to send some of its sons to war and four of them didn’t come back. Newtown would be no ‘thankful village’. https://wyrleyblog.wordpress.com/other-places/long-lane-to-the-long-long-trail-the-walkeden-boys-of-newtown-essington/

Aerial photo of the Gilpin Works and lock system. 1926. (English Heritage)

Aerial photo of the Gilpin Works and lock system. 1926.
(English Heritage)


The first of a three-part story into the pubs of Churchbridge. This one briefly covers the historical landscape and the now long forgotten Red Cow, which was de-licensed in 1891 https://wyrleyblog.wordpress.com/wyrley-landywood/the-churchbridge-pubs/churchbridge-introduction-and-the-red-cow/