Archive for the ‘General War’ Category

Mayor Slater and party, with Julian the tank bank, in Walsall, 1918. Walsall Local History Centre

Part Five: this section looks at the Walsall experience of military ephemera during the years of conflict (tank banks, crashed aircraft, captured guns and Zeppelins), with the aim of understanding what emotions were experienced by Walsall people when confronted with militaria (friendly or hostile), and whether Walsall was unusual in these emotions… https://wp.me/P4ui4e-1Fk

The Reedswood tank sometime between 1925 and 1934. W05861: Walsall Local History Centre

PART 4: opens with a review of changes in Walsall and the army between the Crimea and WWI, then Walsall’s experience of WWI in general… https://wyrleyblog.wordpress.com/?page_id=6402&preview=true

Walsall’s Crimean cannon feature, with clock and fountain, at the Bridge, circa 1865.

Part Three covers the lengthy and messy process that Walsall undertook to obtain and then find a site for its war cannon, without ever really having a view of what they mean’t, followed by the story of their rapid demise…. https://wp.me/P4ui4e-1Fc

Wolverhampton cannon, circa 1862. An example of a local town centre cannon monument (now Queen Square), simply mounted on a plinth. The statue of Prince Albert replaced the cannon in 1866

The second part of this article looks at Walsall’s experiences and views of the Crimean War, how and why Russian cannon came to Britain, and why towns like Walsall, Wolverhampton, Coventry, Ludlow and Hereford sought to use them as features in public spaces… https://wp.me/P4ui4e-1F8

William Meikle’s painting of the Crimean feature in Walsall (1938). Meikle was born in Tipton around 1858, but moved to Walsall in the 1860s. He would remember the feature. He died, at the age of 84, in 1943.
Acc 63/6: Walsall Local History Centre


Walsall displayed and then destroyed its Crimean and Great War ordnance and the purpose of this series of articles is to understand what such things meant and why attitudes changed… https://wp.me/P4ui4e-1EK


Harrisons Club in Great Wyrley was opened in 1909, as an institute for the miners from his pit and local people. Within a few years its committee and membership faced the problems of the Great War and the government war on alcohol. This article precedes that on the war memorials in the Club and briefly examines the problems such a social club faced… https://wyrleyblog.wordpress.com/wyrley-landywood/the-harrisons-club-great-wyrley-war-memorial-history/harrisons-club-and-the-great-war/

Harold Chilton, of Churchbridge, Bridgtown and Shirebrook

This article will form a part of the forthcoming GWLHS/HLF book on Gt Wyrley in WWI… It is impossible to track everyone that lived in Great Wyrley and then left, going on to fall in the conflict; it did, however, feel right that I should find someone to act as representative for all of those that fall into this category, in order to show they are included in this community book at least in spirit. The story of the Chilton family, and it was Harold Chilton, once of Churchbridge, that was initially the focus, stands as that representative not only for Great Wyrley but also for our neighbours in Bridgtown… https://wyrleyblog.wordpress.com/wyrley-landywood/the-chilton-family-at-war-1914-1945/

An article on the Greek concept of the war trophy and how different it is to what could be considered war trophies today  https://wyrleyblog.wordpress.com/about/all-greek-to-me-hellenism-war-and-the-war-trophy/

Cheslyn Hay c1926, the Red Lion is the white building dead centre of the photograph. (Britain from Above)

This part takes in the stories of Private Walton (who lies at Rugeley) and Private William Usher Parnaby (who is linked with Cheslyn Hay), two soldiers that were broken by the circumstances of a world they were caught-up in, powerless to do anything about, and a military machine that was incapable and unable to offer much in the way of sympathy or help… https://wp.me/P4ui4e-1oY

My fantastic family at Pompeii, just prior to my diagnosis.


This isn’t something that will be shared or likely even read and, at the end of the day, I didn’t really want to write it – it is just something I have to dohttps://wyrleyblog.wordpress.com/about/brothers-in-arms-personal-musings-for-world-cancer-day/